"We...the people" of Michigan
have inhabited our     FREE DE JURE STATE
~Samuel Adams   SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; “FATHER OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION”;
RATIFIER OF THE U. S. CONSTITUTION; GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS

I . . . [rely] upon the merits of Jesus Christ for a pardon of all my sins.10   The name of the Lord (says the Scripture) is a strong tower; thither the
righteous flee and are safe [Proverbs 18:10]. Let us secure His favor and He will lead us through the journey of this life and at length receive us to a
better.11

I conceive we cannot better express ourselves than by humbly supplicating the Supreme Ruler of the world . . . that the confusions that are and have
been among the nations may be overruled by the promoting and speedily bringing in the holy and happy period when the kingdoms of our Lord and
Savior Jesus Christ may be everywhere established, and the people willingly bow to the scepter of Him who is the Prince of Peace.12

He also called on the State of Massachusetts to pray that . . . the peaceful and glorious reign of our Divine Redeemer may be known and enjoyed
throughout the whole family of mankind.13 we may with one heart and voice humbly implore His gracious and free pardon through Jesus Christ,
supplicating His Divine aid . . . [and] above all to cause the religion of Jesus Christ, in its true spirit, to spread far and wide till the whole earth shall
be filled with His glory.14 with true contrition of heart to confess their sins to God and implore forgiveness through the merits and mediation of
Jesus Christ our Savior.15
Reference
"We have staked the whole future of American civilization, not upon
the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future ...
upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to sustain
ourselves, according to the Ten Commandments of God."
     ~ James Madison
"The 10 Commandments contain 297 words. The Bill of Rights is stated in 463 words. Lincoln's Gettysburg Address contains
266 words. A recent federal directive to regulate the price of cabbage contains 26,911 words."
The Atlanta Journal